Jerome B Simandle - Judge Jerome Simandle Corrupt Judge Review

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Judge Jerome Simandle tosses civil rights cases against crime boss and his allies.

Federal prosecutors in the United States declined to pursue civil rights allegations against law enforcement officers 96 percent of the time from 1995 to 2015, results from a Tribune-Review investigation released on Saturday reveal.

In a six month period the newspaper built up a database of close to 3 million records from the Department of Justice’s National Caseload Data and analyzed criminal complaints by the calendar year when they were filed.

Statistics say that 12,703 potential civil rights violations were turned down across the country out of 13,233 total complaints from 1995-2015 including high-profile incidents in Ferguson, Missouri, Chicago and New York City.

Alarmingly, prosecutors received referrals involving 21,364 law enforcement officers over the 21 year time frame, yet only 631 were convicted of civil rights abuses.

While 11 federal districts, including Alaska, Colorado and New Jersey, received a total of 240 referrals, no officers were formally charged.

The paper says the most frequent reasons cited for declining civil rights complaints involving officers were mainly weak or insufficient evidence, lack of criminal intent required under a 1945 Supreme Court ruling standard, and orders from the Justice Department.

“We don’t hesitate to open a file on a civil rights case, yet it’s one of the most difficult cases to gather sufficient evidence to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt at trial,” Steve Kaufman, from the U.S. Attorney’s office for Western Pennsylvania said. “Obviously then you do have a relatively high percentage that don’t end up being prosecuted.”

Craig Futterman, a law professor who founded the Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project at the University of Chicago, says that pursuing policemen who have violated the law is an area that authorities need to look into.

“This is an area, quite honestly, where the feds need to be bolder and put greater resources in,” he said. “Indeed, the failure to aggressively bring those cases has allowed too many abusive officers to believe that they can operate without fear of punishment.”

One constant in the investigation’s findings is that no matter how many referrals prosecutors received across the U.S. they consistently declined more than 90 percent of them.

The number has remained steady even as the number of smartphones, able to record law enforcement officers abusing civil rights by photo or video, in civilian hands has risen.

For all other non civil crimes, prosecutors rejected only about 23 percent of complaints, the paper found.

This content was originally published by teleSUR.

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h.kitchener

Oct 10 #1224803 Columbia, South Carolina, United States

Apparently, your "complaint" is that cases were turned down for prosecution based on "weak or insufficient evidence, lack of criminal intent required under a 1945 Supreme Court ruling standard, and orders from the Justice Department." Sounds like sound judicial reasons to me.

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Anonymous

Oct 11 #1225121 Clementon, New Jersey, United States

Simandle should be investigated. Here's the problem.
Majority of lawsuit against power broker and his political friends tossed out
12:40 AM, Mar. 31, 2007
In tapes central to the case, George E. Norcross was heard bragging about his influence over political leaders at every level.
In tapes central to the case, George E. Norcross was heard bragging about his influence over political leaders at every level.
Written by RICHARD PEARSALL Courier-Post Staff FILED UNDER Local News A federal judge Friday dismissed the bulk of a lawsuit filed against Democratic power broker George E. Norcross and others in connection with the so-called Palmyra tapes, but allowed one part of the 4-year-old suit to proceed. U.S. District Judge Jerome Simandle ruled that the plaintiffs, Moorestown attorney Ted Rosenberg and Palmyra Mayor John Gural, failed to demonstrate "any harm to their "business or property' as a plaintiff is required to show under the federal RICO laws." Rosenberg and Gural filed suit under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act, one of ...

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Anonymous

Oct 27 #1232867

You are misinformed like most people who are still on a plantation
Simandle has been tossing cases for Norcross for years, this is why Norcross never goes down. He uses media and other corrupt Judges like Simandle to destroy people who have been harassed by this Machine and his bully buddies.

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